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Community-engaged Research Fellowship

Statement of Purpose: The Wake Forest School of Medicine (WFSM) Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) Program in Community Engagement (PCE) is seeking applications for a 12-month Community-engaged Research Fellowship beginning in August 2018. Applications should be submitted from teams comprised of a community partner and a WFSM research partner.  

Translational science is the process of turning scientific discoveries into practical applications with potential to improve health. The CTSI PCE facilitates collaboration among community members, representatives from community organizations, community healthcare providers and practitioners, and academic researchers in translational science. A goal of the PCE and this Community-engaged Research Fellowship is to build, sustain, and expand the interest and capacity of community members and WFSM researchers to collaborate in translational science. The Community-engaged Research Fellowship supports representatives from community organizations and WFSM researchers to build a community-engaged research partnership. The goal of the Fellowship is to nurture existing, and/or facilitate the establishment of, a community-engaged research partnership through trust building, skills development, and co-learning. The community partner will learn about research design, proposal development, and skills that might enhance operations and build organizational capacity (e.g., program development and evaluation). The WFSM research partner will learn how community organizations prioritize, function, and overcome obstacles and how community-engaged research can be implemented in community settings. To facilitate collaboration and support the partnership, both the community partner and the WFSM research partner will have access to PCE resources and expertise. 

The following elements are required for successful application for this internship: 

  1. The Community Partner and WFSM Research Partner will collaborate to complete the joint Community-engaged Research Fellowship Application.

  2. Community Partner
    a. A representative from a community organization will partner with a WFSM researcher.
    b. The community partner will spend 10% of their time (paid for by WFSM) to work with the WFSM research partner for 12 months.
    c. A letter of support from the community partner’s supervisor or Board of Directors (if the organization partner is the Executive Director) affirming that 10% of their time will be made available to participate in the Community-engaged Research Fellowship for the 12-month period. 

  3. WFSM Research Partner
    a. A WFSM researcher will partner with a representative from a community organization.
    b. The WFSM research partner will spend 10% of their time (paid for by WFSM) to work with the community partner for 12 months.
    c. A letter of support from the WFSM research partner’s Department Chair documenting that 10% of their time will be made available to participate in the Community-engaged Research Fellowship experience for the 12-month period.        

Applications (including letters of support) are due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, July 1, 2018. 

For questions contact:
Phillip Summers, MPH, Associate Director
Program in Community Engagement, Clinical Translational Science Institute
Wake Forest School of Medicine
p.summers@wakehealth.edu

2017-2018 Interns

 

Elizabeth Jensen, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Epidemiology & Prevention in the Division of Public Health Sciences. Dr. Jensen’s research focuses primarily on early-life environmental exposures that promote development of future diseases, as well as mechanisms of disease among children and adolescents. As an intern with the Program in Community Engagement, Dr. Jensen plans to partner with the Forsyth County Health Department Lead Safety program, the City of Winston-Salem, and various community organizations to gain a better understanding of Forsyth County’s lead testing program, identify opportunities to mitigate exposure to lead in early life (in utero and early childhood), and implement an initiative to characterize lead exposure risk in historically marginalized neighborhoods. 

Mark Wolfson, PhD, is a Professor of Social Sciences & Health Policy in the Division of Public Health Sciences and Director of the Center for Research on Substance Use and Addiction. Dr. Wolfson is an expert in the field of substance abuse, including abuse and misuse of alcohol, tobacco, illicit drugs, and prescription drugs. His research career has focused heavily on the implementation and impact of substance use policy and prevention programs to promote population health. As an intern with the Program in Community Engagement, Dr. Wolfson will partner with Insight Human Services, a front-line agency providing substance abuse prevention, intervention, and treatment services, and will focus on the epidemic of overdose stemming from opioid abuse in Western North Carolina.

2016-2017 Interns

 

Wendy Dixon, is from Love Out Loud and The Brownsboro Community Partnership.  Justin Moore PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine is mentoring Wendy.  

 

2015-2016 Interns

 

Lynn Rhoades, M.Div. Co-Founder & Executive Director, Authoring Action. Lynn is currently an academic intern. Through her internship, she is learning about research and program evaluation. This new understanding of the research process serves as the basis for continuing to improve and promote the work of Authoring Action. It is through such partnerships as this that the Program in Community Engagement can build the capacity of community organizations to collaborate in translational science.  Lynn is working with Stephanie Daniel PhD, Professor in the department of Family and Community Medicine.

Linton

Julie M. Linton, M.D. Assistant Professor, Pediatrics, Wake Forest School of Medicine. Dr. Linton is the current community intern.  She is working with local community organizations to create an immigrant child health network.  The work will bring together existing services and coordinate their approach to apply to the particular needs of immigrant children.

2013-2014 Interns


Elizabeth SchiemannDirector of Operations, El Buen Pastor Latino Community Services. Elizabeth is currently serving as a community intern. Through her internship, she is learning about the research process and sharing that knowledge with her organization. This new understanding of the research process serves as the foundation for the Family Literacy Initiative at El Buen Pastor. It is through such partnerships as this that the Program in Community Engagement can build the capacity of community organizations to collaborate in translational science.

2012-2013 Interns


LaChelle Waller, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine Research, will work with several Winston-Salem Forsyth County elementary schools in the implementation of the Science Fair Workshop, a project to assist parents of elementary-aged students to help their children participate in local science fairs. Dr. Waller was instrumental in developing this program last year and will use this externship to refine the program and write about it in a professional journal article.

Denise Houston, PhD, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine in the Sticht Center on Aging, will work with several community-based organizations for older adults that provide nutrition and health services. This externship will focus on creating relationships with organizations such as these in order to deliver nutritional programs and translate other research that has proven effective in clinical/academic settings.

Christina Hugenschmidt, PhD, Instructor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, will work with the Alzheimer’s Association of Western North Carolina. Her externship will focus on the dissemination of research findings to this community-based organization and its constituents. Dr. Hugenschmidt hopes to learn how to organize and give informational public outreach lectures that are culturally relevant to groups within a particular community.

Sara Quandt, PhD, Professor of Epidemiology and Prevention in the Division of Public Health Sciences, is working with several community organizations. This externship will focus on understanding the food environment of northwest North Carolina, particularly Forsyth County. The food environment includes the sources of foods and distribution of access to these food sources, as well as the social, cultural, and political forces that underlie these. Understanding the food environment is needed to improve dietary intake for primary and secondary prevention of chronic diseases and their risk factors.